Dene Leigh’s practice investigates neurological impairment and the fragility of human memory. Through painting, sculpture and drawing, the artist’s work endeavours to make sense of his grandfather’s difficulty with memory following a stroke. After experiencing life with the consequences of the stroke for several years, the artist’s grandfather passed away. Soon after, the abrupt passing of the artist’s mother generated an urge to grasp the memories and fleeting moments associated with those who are most important to him.


Faceless figures, illegible lettering and ambiguous objects, are recurrent images that explore three of the barriers to the artist’s grandfather’s everyday life that shook the artist the most. The barriers caused the inability to grasp language in its written and spoken form and rendered once familiar faces and objects unrecognisable.


The artist’s body of work embodies the fragility of human memory and the desire to acknowledge and record those he has and has not met. The artist continually documents recollections of those dearest to him with themes of the barriers that his grandfather faced. In doing so, the work tries to glimpse through the eyes of the artist’s grandfather, whilst solidifying the short-lived moments associated with the human memory and the ultimate decay of everything around us.

Dene Leigh is a British Artist who studied at Wimbledon College of Arts, London. The artist's work has been written about in international contemporary art publications Hi-Fructose and Daily Serving. Solo exhibitions include 'Ephemeral' (2018) and 'Agnosia' (2016) at Baert Gallery in Los Angeles. The artist's work has been selected for the 2020 Derwent Art Prize held in London and Paris, and in recent years he has been selected to exhibit at the 2014 Young Masters Art Prize and the 2017 and 2018 Royal Academy of Arts Summer Exhibition. The artist lives and works in London and is represented by Baert Gallery Los Angeles.

 

©2020 Dene Leigh | London

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